The federal agency responsible for deporting illegal immigrants is in serious trouble, with overwhelmed officers that can’t keep up with monstrous workloads and repeatedly lose track of hardcore criminals inside the United States. Hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens with criminal records have been released by authorities in the U.S. and the Homeland Security agency responsible for keeping track of them, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), is doing a miserable job, according to a new audit made public this week by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Inspector General.

As of August 2016, ICE was supervising about 2.2 million aliens released into communities throughout the nation. Officially they are known as appearing on the “non-detained docket.” About 368,574 are convicted criminals, the watchdog report states. To put things in perspective the inspector general reveals that in 2015 ICE removed 235,413 individuals of which 139,368 were convicted criminals. A surge in illegal immigrants under the Obama administration pushed matters into crisis mode. Deportation officers are so overworked that they often lose track of dangerous illegal aliens with serious criminal histories. This includes individuals who represent critical national security threats, according to the federal probe.

ICE does not ensure that deportation officer workloads are balanced and achievable, the report states, and the agency doesn’t provide clear policies and procedures or sufficient training and tools. Additionally, ICE fails to effectively prepare its workforce to handle complicated deportations. The result is an agency that operates in chaos and compromises the well-being of unsuspecting communities nationwide, not to mention national security. “ICE does not effectively manage the supervision and deportation of nondetained aliens,” the report says. “Effective management requires preparing and deploying the right number of employees to achieve program and policy objectives.” Furthermore, the agency doesn’t bother collecting and analyzing data about employee workloads to allocate staff judiciously and determine achievable caseloads, according to the inspector general.

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