It’s hard to say whether Apple has been particularly sloppy recently with its software updates, or whether this is a growing trend in software in general.

It’s hard to say whether Apple has been particularly sloppy recently with its software updates, or whether this is a growing trend in software in general.

As the week draws to a close, it’s definitely been a long one for Apple’s software engineers. The nightmare started on Tuesday, after a Twitter user disclosed a critical security vulnerability for macOS High Sierra that allowed anyone with physical access to a Mac to gain system administrator privileges without even entering a password. As software bugs go, this one was embarrassing and critical, but Apple managed to fix it less than 24 hours after it was publicly disclosed.

“Security is a top priority for every Apple product, and regrettably we stumbled with this release of macOS,” admitted an Apple spokesperson. “We greatly regret this error and we apologize to all Mac users, both for releasing with this vulnerability and for the concern it has caused. Our customers deserve better. We are auditing our development processes to help prevent this from happening again.”

As the auditing of development processes begins, other issues have come to light on the macOS side as a result of this software fix. Apple’s security update ended up introducing a problem preventing Mac users from authenticating or connecting to file shares on their Macs. Apple was forced to issue yet another support document to detail a fix for these users, helping Mac owners gain access to file shares again.

That seemed to be an embarrassing end to the problems, but late last night reports emerged that Apple’s rushed software patch could be just as buggy as the code it was supposed to fix.

Source…


(Visited 44 times, 1 visits today)